Get Amplified

A New Perspective on Team Performance and Productivity

November 24, 2023 Amplified Group Season 4 Episode 12
Get Amplified
A New Perspective on Team Performance and Productivity
Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

Ever wondered what propels a high-performance team? Vic is on this special Amplified only podcast, with co-host Pippa Hutchinson to give you an insider's view.  

We dig deep into the dynamics of highly productive teams, who are not just aligned and collaborative, but also exhibit a strong sense of belonging. 

If you’re struggling with team productivity,  being asked to do more with less or even flat headcount.  Then we have some answers.

 We explore how the tech industry measures speed of execution, the new metric for  differentiation and introduce you to a tool that's revolutionizing team dynamics: the Speed Check.

This tool measures your team's execution prowess across four key pillars: purpose, trust, clarity, and simplicity. We also dissect common red flags like high clarity and low trust, and the deceptive phenomenon of artificial harmony. Prepare to shift your perspective as we underscore the importance of simplicity as a mindset and the power of every voice being heard. Buckle up for an enlightening ride into the heart of team performance.

We would love you to follow us on LinkedIn!

https://www.linkedin.com/company/amplified-group/

Speaker 2:

Hello. So this is exciting this morning. I am joined today with Pippa Hutchinson, one of our amplifiers. I'm trying not to call her Philippa, because we're on our best behavior today, but we haven't got Sam. And the reason we haven't got Sam is we're doing a special this morning because what is becoming really apparent from the many, many clients that we're working with now is that our amplified group speed check is just becoming such a critical tool and we're finding that we're explaining it an awful lot, and we thought actually it'd be a really good idea to share it on a podcast, so that we've just got it captured. I suppose you're asking what is the speed check and why is it important? So, just in a nutshell, at the amplified group, our absolute fundamental belief is that the tech industry is powered by people and it's how we work together that absolutely makes the difference. And why that's really important is that because time and time again at the minute, we are hearing that every organization needs to do more with less. So this is about how do we get more productivity from the people that we've already got? And what our speed check does is it measures that there is an absolute, unquestionable correlation between sales performance and what our speed check tells you, but you're coming at it from a how you working together to make these results happen, and so that's why we're gathering momentum, and sorry for the very long intro there, but that's that's why we're doing this. Pip, so great to have you with us. Thank you, victoria.

Speaker 3:

As you were tempted to call me Philippa earlier on this podcast.

Speaker 2:

I'm afraid so.

Speaker 3:

Very cross that I've been referred to as addressed as Philippa people, that he called me Philippa when they're telling me off. Okay, we won't do that now, then no, I don't, unless you're about to tell me off. No, she's more than possible, no no, not at all.

Speaker 2:

So you are mastermind of the speed check, but actually I say you're a mastermind of our speed check. I just feel like I just need to do a quick shout out to. Martin, exactly so, martin Kelly, who is one of our amplifiers and who, gosh, it's such a privilege to work with him. Martin and I worked together to come up with the speed check a few years ago now, and who would have thought it would just have the impact that it's having? So shout out to Martin. But since we created it, the button has absolutely come over to you. Pip, what is the speed check? Tell us about it.

Speaker 3:

So I'm just building on what you were saying and just taking that very quick step back just to establish why this is such an important tool, really, really simply, it baselines your current speed of execution and if that's building on the principle that it's speed of execution that's your differentiator in your competitiveness in tech but actually not just tech in any industry so productivity is what it's all about. It's not product anymore, it's people, and how those people pull together and execute at speed. Productive and tall intents and purposes are a high performance team. That's what we're looking to establish and what we want to do is establish that as a baseline. So where are they now? And then, with some interventions, what could really really great speed of execution look like? So we thought it would be useful just to paint a picture of what's the team that's on fire. What does it look and feel like if you work in a really, really high performance team? And let's just walk through what that is on a day to day basis. So if you work in a really and hopefully if you do work in a high performance team, you'll recognise some of these characteristics that resonate with you and describe your working environment. So if you work in a high performance team. You're very aligned behind you and your team. You're aligned behind, you're energised, you're engaged, all behind a shared vision. Your collaboration levels are through the roof and that's not just a temporary feeling, that's something that's sustainable throughout that engagement with your team. So not just day one, but throughout.

Speaker 2:

So can I just come in on that? Because we see an awful lot and I certainly experienced it in my career where you'd be working in a team, and the amount of counter productivity because you're not all working towards a common goal and you think why on earth are they spending their time doing that? Because that's not helping. Yeah, is that what you're talking about?

Speaker 3:

Yeah, precisely Right. Okay, got it. Because you can't cut through the noise and deliver if you're not aligned behind the same goals and the same vision. Yeah, you can't have silos of people working off on their own agendas and their own, their own version of what they think they're in there to achieve. Yeah, so when everybody is aligned and collaborating behind a vision, that, in its own right, is a really energizing environment to work in, yeah, you're pulling together, yeah, okay, some of the parts is bigger than the whole, okay, and what else does it look and feel like? If you work in a high performance team, well, you should have created amongst you all a real sense of belonging. So, if I work in a high performance team, as I do, hopefully, I think I do, we definitely do, I think we definitely do I'm more than happy. If I've mucked up on something, I will admit to my mistakes. I will, and I haven't always felt as comfortable to do that, believe you me, as I do. In the environment I work in now, it's no biggie If I've made a mistake. You fess up to it and you learn from it and you move on and everybody has got each other's back. That's the whole point of that sense of belonging Everybody. If you take Victoria and myself as examples, vicky is more extra hurt than I am. That's. We know that. But I don't feel that my voice isn't heard in this environment. So I'm a quieter version of Vick. I will always be given that opportunity for my voice to be heard, and so will the people that are quieter than me in the room as well. It's about being all inclusive and making sure that everybody because everybody has a role to play everybody has a contribution to make. So it's giving people that sense of belonging and that infrastructure where they feel able to speak up.

Speaker 2:

Do you know? What I really like is the podcast that we recorded with Cisco's Mark Murphy, when he says he uses his elbows to make space for people. I think if everyone feels like they're being heard and they've got that opportunity to be heard, what a difference that makes and the whole approach of actually feeling like you're contributing and that you've got a voice, versus there's no point in me speaking it, because what's the point? Because no one's going to take any notice of it. How disengaging is that? Completely, yeah.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, that's self fulfilling as well. Yeah, the minute you're not heard, you're less inclined to ever want to be heard, because you just think that you have no role to play so that's just breeze on itself.

Speaker 2:

And that's like a commitment, then, isn't it? Yeah, precisely yeah.

Speaker 3:

Another feature of a high performance team these guys in the high performance team. It's not about them as individuals, it's about the team, so they view the team through this lens of its collective success. That's important. It's what we're achieving as a group of people, not as individuals, and in that vein, that means, then, that because it's the team that they want to be successful, they're prepared to hold each other to account to make sure that that team is moving in the right direction, and they've got 100% clarity. This is so crucial in terms of how high performance teams are able to act. That clarity, 100% clarity, a laser like focus on the plan and their individual and their team roles in making that plan come to life, supported by fantastic communication and feedback Again really pivotal in all of this that's what's a good feature of a high performance team.

Speaker 2:

Can I ask a question there? How easy is it to get 100% clarity?

Speaker 3:

Well, you have to start at the leadership level and it's not easy. It's very, very difficult to achieve 100% clarity, but there's a sequence of events that can happen to make sure that you're starting to get towards being very clear on what the plan is. And it starts at the leadership level and it starts with trust, and we'll pull on that a little bit later and talk about that.

Speaker 2:

There's so much. You just mentioned trust there. There is so much out there on. In fact, we've just seen that Amy Edmondson the award that she's just won so she's the creator of the term psychological safety and her research. We often talk about Google's project Aristotle, which looked at 250 teams and 200 team attributes. I may have got those numbers the one we ran there but the number one thing for a high performance team wasn't the players on the team, it was the psychological safety that they had. It didn't matter what location they were in, it was down to how much psychological safety they've got. So there's a lot of momentum around that at the moment. However, it's not enough, I don't think, on its own, because I think the thing that's really become clear to me over these last two or three years is when there is a lack of clarity, it can absolutely paralyze organizations, teams, people If the people don't know what is expected of them. And we use such ambiguous terms in tech that you can use a term and everybody's got a different interpretation of it, and so when you're talking about those feedback loops, I'm guessing you're talking about actually having a clarity seeker and somebody going actually having that safe space to go. They actually know what you mean there, how you're defining it.

Speaker 3:

So that is crucial, isn't it?

Speaker 2:

Yeah, so something that I know we're all working to get better at and we actually had a podcast with Dr Carrie Gautier on was productive and focused meetings. Talk to us a little bit about that.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, and again, this is what I was trying to describe earlier is, in this sort of journey that you're on with your team, the sequence of events. You develop your plan, you all get very energized around it and motivated by what you're trying to achieve. But unless you've got some rigor and cadence and a really easy way to keep that vision alive with the team from one working day to the next, it won't stick. So having productive and focused meetings I mean this is a whole different podcast and Carrie covered it beautifully but essentially, having a mechanism for making sure that you're communicating and communicating and communicating the key messages from what you're trying to achieve, from the plan, is so important. To pull to the top of the agenda every time you meet and keeping it really simple and concise so that there's no ambiguity around what are we trying to achieve. And for every team meeting that we have, we revisit it. We make sure that we are doing what we said we were going to do. So it's having that rigor and that cadence around staying on the ball with the meetings.

Speaker 2:

And actually that comes into prioritization as well, doesn't it? Because, you know, one of our favorite podcasts was Jeffrey Moore and, although the title of the podcast was, a chicken can only lay one egg at a time. But it's about actually prioritizing, and if you've got three priorities, ten priorities, that's not a priority.

Speaker 3:

No, what's Patrick Lanciani's favorite quote, or not our favorite? Of Patrick Lanciani's quotes, a ray of them is if everything is important, nothing is yeah.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, and all these conflicting priorities.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, we've talked about this before on podcasts. Competing priorities remains this is what we see in our speed checks Over and, over and over again is a sense of competing priorities. It's really undermining and unraveling progress in tech. So, again, that's one of the things we measure. We will come on to talk about the speed check a little bit more now I think.

Speaker 2:

Should we think yeah, so we've just talked about what you call it. An on fire team looks like. What is the speed check?

Speaker 3:

Yeah, Brilliant question. We've talked around what an on fire team looks like. We've described how it feels to work in a team that's high performance. With the speed check tool, we're quantifying that. We're giving that a baseline measure. So we're aiming to understand what is the current level of execution of a team, or what's its ability to execute at speed, and we distill that down into four key pillars. And so we talk about purpose. Is a team able to act with a really integral and robust purpose? Does everybody understand what the purpose of that team is? That's one pillar. The second pillar is trust. Is this team working? And when we talk about trust we've talked about this many, many times before we're not talking about predictive trust. I'm not talking about the kind of trust that says Vic knows I might be really good at spreadsheets. I'm not, by the way. I don't know why I picked that as an example, because I'm rubbish at spreadsheets Does. Anybody who's worked with me for many years will be able to attest to it. However, say for the sake of the argument, I'm brilliant at spreadsheets, which I am, not Vic. I'm not talking about Vic knowing that she can pull on me to do a spreadsheet because she's predicting that I'm quite good at them. We're not talking about that kind of trust. We're talking about the trust where I'm happy to be vulnerable in a room and admit to my mistakes and tell you that I'm not feeling great that day, for whatever reason. Asking for help, asking for help, that baseline of vulnerability based trust where I've made those connections with my teammates sufficiently that I know they've got my back and I've got theirs, yeah, when we can measure trust as a pillar and it for the word trust also sub in psychological safety and a sense of belonging Everybody. Without a baseline of trust, nothing happens. So we trust is fundamental to what, to what we do as an organization and what we measure so we've got. First pillar is purpose. Second pillar is trust. Trust is very much a human behavior that we're looking at At the Amplified Group. We know it's about business as much as it is about the human. Both those things have to work in concert to create a high performance team. So we look at purpose as a business measure. We look at trust as a human measure. Back to business. We then look at a third pillar which is around us and Vic described beautifully earlier clarity. Is this team working with a laser like focus, and they are absolutely 100% rallied behind a clear vision of what they're there to achieve? And does that clarity live and breathe from one working day to the next? Or does it get diluted and dissipates into the ether because there's too much noise around? So we're measuring that as a third pillar and our final pillar that we measure again a business pillar around. Simplicity Is working here. Can I get what I need to do? How easy is it to get stuff done around here? Or am I in a cogmire of approvals, processes and bureaucracy and you just going to smash away all of my enthusiasm for doing anything because it's too blinking difficult to get anything done? So how have has this team got a less is more mindset and the ability to execute on that? Are they supported by the infrastructure of the organization so that they don't feel it's them and us, they feel they can actually get things done? So those are the four pillars. We measure those. We've been doing this for a long time now. This will start with Martin. As Vic said quite a long time ago, several years ago, we've now got a robust base of hundreds of these speech at results. So we've got a really good, clear, back to clarity, clear view on what good looks like for speed of execution in the tech industry. We're able to benchmark all of our clients against a aspired tech benchmark for the industry. So hang on.

Speaker 2:

I just stop and start on that and just just get some clarity around it prodded a bit. Yeah, let's put it to it as you just said, that there's two different numbers. There's the number that we see from the results that we've got, so we've got a sense of what the average speed of tech organizations is going at the real average. And then we've also got a benchmark of where we believe.

Speaker 3:

Good, that's right, exactly. Yeah, we are going to very quickly touch on what a speed check is. Yeah, so it's the first thing to say is it's dead easy, as the recipient, to complete these assessments. It's a five minute piece of work for the person who's answering the survey. It's anonymous.

Speaker 2:

Which is a challenge for us, and the positive, yeah, the fact that it is completely anonymous. So when we're filling it in, or when we're asking organizations to fill it in, we don't know who's filled it in and who hasn't, so that actually causes us a little bit of a challenge. However, we do get plus 85% completion rates, and the fact that it's anonymous, I suppose, means that we really get the truth out.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, we do. And with the speed check, there's an opportunity as well to fill in freeform commentary. Yeah, and there are some very big insights in that commentary. That is a real game changer for some of the leadership teams in our organizations because We've worked with, yeah. Yeah, it's really pulling in some stuff that they genuinely were not aware of and it is, as I say, it's game changing. Yeah, and the beauty of having a third party who's not biased in terms of interpreting the results is really powerful in this context. Yeah, so what happens is how many statements are there? They can't remember 30. 30. So, as a recipient, you're basically you get 30 statements to respond to, and a statement may be. I can trust my colleagues to be accountable to the actions we have agreed. That's just an example. And now, as the person filling in the survey, I will grade my answer from one to six, one being I fundamentally disagree with that statement. Six being yeah, that's us, and it's the nuances in between that we're measuring effectively. It's so quick to fill this in, it's a five-minute piece of work for the recipient, but the insights that it delivers back again are just incredible.

Speaker 2:

And just say that's not just saying that. That's what the client said. Yeah.

Speaker 3:

That'd be a big time if it was just me saying, oh, the insights are incredible and, yes, it's a phenomenal tool and it's low risk If you're, because it's anonymous, there's no risk attached to you filling that in as a recipient. It's yeah, it's just, it's very interesting in terms of the results. So what it's doing is fundamentally, at the end of the week, collect all of the answers. So if it's a team of 30 people, we're able to pop out of that analysis a percentage speed, if that makes sense and what we want to see, what good looks like, is 83%.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, that's our industry benchmark.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, 83 is a magic number, and what we'll do then is we will unpick the results, which may be for the second day arguments 70% and we will try to unpick. We won't try to do unpick. Why is it 70% and not 83?

Speaker 2:

And what I find fascinating from reading our reports is you can have two teams on 70%, for example, but they'll have reached 70% for completely different reasons. Yeah yeah.

Speaker 3:

So within an EMEA region, for example, you can start to see what the differences are between various regions. One region may have some really clear barriers to success. It may be that they're working with a level of bureaucracy that another region just doesn't face and therefore they're able to drive best speed of execution higher. So it's looking for the bright spots of where good good practices, best practices in regional differences, and really leveraging all of the insights that that gives you to make things better across the whole piece. In this context, the EMEA region.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, I think it's, and sorry if we're jumping ahead here, but the fact that you come out of a speed check with an action plan of what to go and address, that is different to. I need to make sure that my forecast is all the stuff that we know already. It's a different lens, isn't it?

Speaker 3:

Completely yeah. So at the end of the speech at report, when you receive that, it will give you a last page which shows you what your priority focus areas are. And it may be that actually what's holding your team back is the fact that you've only got together and been assembled as a team since we came out of the pandemic and you just don't know each other very well yet. You've only had those interactions on Zoom. If you haven't built those connections and you haven't coalesced around a table or to work on a common topic together, then you've got no chance of delivering as a team because you haven't built a baseline of trust with each other.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, and that's compounded, isn't it? Because people are working in that we're just still trying to figure out how to work in this hybrid world, just getting aligned on priorities. One of the things the red flag for me when I look at a speech at report is if I see really high clarity and low trust. That's another alarm bell for us, because people are being told what to do but they're not being Command and control. It's command and control versus being brought into it and motivated to do it, and that can have huge impact on the stress levels and motivation levels in an organisation. Because, ultimately, that team that you were talking about at the beginning, that high performance team, is a team that will just go the extra mile, that loves their job, that loves doing what they're doing. That motivated team is a winning team. And, coming right back to the beginning of the tech, industry is powered by people and it's how we work together. So, not what we're working on, because we can do that bit, but how we work together. That's the bit that's missing currently, that we're getting under the skin of, and that's why we're getting so much momentum in doing what we're doing.

Speaker 3:

Precisely the power of having a baseline and being able to quantify that and know and be able to distill down. What are the key challenges for this team? Is it that they don't have the clarity they need? Is it that they haven't got to know each other yet to develop trust? Is it that they're surrounded by so much bureaucracy that things aren't simple enough to execute on? Or is it that they've just never aligned behind the same purpose as each other? Once you understand the answers to those questions and you can baseline that, that's when you deliver an action plan against it to move that dial forwards. Do you think we should talk about some of the key themes that we're what's coming out? So you touched on a really important one earlier, which was around, if you see that red flag that you were talking about.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, the high clarity and low trust.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, where that potentially is a command and control approach, can I just prop up a little bit more and tell us what's going on there to have created that?

Speaker 2:

dynamic. Well that's, I think that's seen as more of a hierarchical approach and actually we're really starting to see organisations understanding that. In fact, you know, just go back to Scott Herron, cfo of Cisco. He says if you want to be a leader, people need to want to follow you. What you just described there is the opposite. Yeah, precisely yeah, that, and that can be a highly stressful environment to work in.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, the other one that we see is we call it artificial harmony, and we see that quite a lot in our speech-check findings. That teams are operating in this world where they feel like they're all very well aligned and they feel like they've got the right level of trust in the room, but actually, when you dig into that little bit more, they're not prepared to actually engage in robust debate with each other. They're not comfortable to be uncomfortable in each of this company and, you know, really sort of get under the skin of new ideas and debate things for the best outcomes for the customer. Ultimately they're just not prepared to do that and that again is down to the fact that they haven't built strong enough connections with each other in the first place to be able to have that healthy conflict. So they end up just being very harmonious, but actually that's just smoke and mirrors.

Speaker 2:

So what's the impact of that on the business?

Speaker 3:

Well, if you've got a team who isn't prepared or doesn't have that mechanism to really as we were just using the word prod an idea and make sure it's fit for purpose and get everybody's buy-in and take on that Ultimately, unless you've gone through that phase of conflict in other words, toss the ideas around and, really, you know, debate them rigorously with each other unless you're prepared to go through that process and everybody's had a chance to chip in and say their piece, if I haven't been offered that opportunity to get involved in that discussion and say my piece, ultimately I'm not going to commit to the outcome. If I'm not going to commit to the outcome, then you've lost me, you've lost me I've siloed myself off now from the team.

Speaker 2:

What that's just made me think about is we all almost think it's quicker to tell people what to do, because they will. If you've told them what to do, they should just get on with it. But who likes being told what to do Precisely?

Speaker 3:

Yeah, and even then, you know, again, I might not agree. We're not looking for consensus, we're looking for commitment. So what's the difference between that? Oh, about how many days? Six months, was it the difference between?

Speaker 2:

consensus and commitment is how long? Yeah, yeah, my experience is six months. We're trying to get everybody around the table, particularly if you're trying to work across regions, to come on board and you've got a consensus culture. It can take months and months, and months to do that, and my argument is we just haven't got time to do that anymore.

Speaker 3:

And that is not saying so do command and control. That's saying, invite everybody in the room to say their piece, to have a voice and to be heard. Give me a chance to be heard. It doesn't matter what it does. It's not relevant that I might not agree with the final direction that's been picked, but I'm more likely to commit to it if I have a chance to help shape it.

Speaker 2:

Yes, yeah, yeah, I mean, we love it, don't we? When we get to a point of we're working on something we don't even know who's? The idea it was yeah who started it in the first place. It's just a culmination of all of it.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, we're all about iterations in this team, so it's not continuous improvement and it doesn't matter who's great idea where it was. Nobody remembers that, but it's we all build on that.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, I mean, the speech check is a great example of that of outputted, that isn't it? Yeah?

Speaker 3:

I'm just polishing somebody else's ideas. Yeah, so yes, that's. A key finding is there's a lot of artificial harmony around, which is short termism at its best. Really, this feels ostensibly like a great place to be, but actually that's not a team that's going to go on and deliver great things.

Speaker 2:

Particularly when things get hard, particularly when things get hard, yeah, yeah. The other thing I think you get in that kind of environment is you get a lot of passive aggressive where people are nodding to your face. That's artificial harmony, isn't it yeah, and then they just go off and do their and then they have a meeting on about the meeting. Yeah, Another meeting. A sidebar meeting, and how much energy is wasted not pulling in the same direction.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, All through our careers. We've seen that in action, where you leave the meeting room and you say that was a waste of time. Yeah, Chief, nothing.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, yeah, we aim not to have those, don't we? We do.

Speaker 3:

Because that's a complete waste of energy. Yeah, I think so. There are some key things that are coming out. Simplicity is, almost to a organisation, a driving factor in why teams are not able to execute at speed.

Speaker 2:

And nearly every speed check we do, simplicity is the lowest score.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, I can't think of many examples where it isn't no, but there are a few.

Speaker 2:

There are a few that have absolutely overcome the challenges of simplicity, and ensuring simplicity is the mindset, and it is a mindset, it's an attitude of the team.

Speaker 3:

It is an attitude of the team, but they have to be given the infrastructure to deliver on that mindset. Yes, we've seen this quite recently where there are quite a few regional teams where it's obvious when you start to look through their results they're so desperate to work with a less small mindset. They're all. They've developed a clear approach to what they want to achieve but they haven't been given the organisational mechanism around them to cut through all the rubbish, to the noise to make things happen and that's real danger territory because that team is going to lose momentum and enthusiasm for what they do pretty quickly. So we always say actually take that away and start to dig into that. What's holding you back and what can you influence? But what do you need to push back into your corporate chain to get some support and advocacy behind to change things? And again, the beauty of a speech check is it starts to give you a voice to go back. Because if you've got a regional array of results that show you that all the regions in a global organisation are all struggling with something like I don't know approvals processes, because that organisation is scaling really quickly. You've got a measurement on that. You've got a measurement on it and you've got some power behind a voice that says we need something to change here.

Speaker 2:

That's another benefit of the speech check.

Speaker 3:

I suppose it is because once you start to roll up all of the results, you're getting something really, really robust to challenge some of the corporate norms that have just rolled out over time, because the organisation is scaling so quickly that it's run away with itself and nobody's putting the brakes on to say, actually have we questioned?

Speaker 2:

how we do things. Yeah, and I think that's a good point If you think the vast majority of organisations we're working with. We say we're helping the tech organisations that are going through scale and that's just growing pains, yeah completely.

Speaker 3:

That's a great way to describe it, and what you see in the simplicity measure is those growing pains revealed, really, and but it's only until you've put that on a side of A4 or digital side of A4 that you can begin to focus in on the problem.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, no, that makes complete sense. Is there anything else that you need to share with us before we finish?

Speaker 3:

I wish that I'd worked in an environment where we had something like this 20 years ago. I think it's so powerful and so simple to give clarity and shine a light on what's working well in organisations and just to stress it does. I mean, we talk about tech a lot because that's our area that we work the most with, and actually what we're describing here are panoramic issues for industry at large. Yeah, there's nothing in here that isn't translatable into any industry. No, because it's about power, people are working together. It's about power people.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, but I also think it's important. You know we talk about simplicity as one of our measures. It's also one of our values, isn't it? That amplified group. And one of the things that I'm particularly proud of with the speed check is the simplicity of the process you go through so that you get a tailored speed check for your organisation. But not only that the report. It's not a 50 page report for each team, it's two and a half pages of content at the most. It's very quick and it cuts to the heart of what are the challenges that this team have or what are the great things that this team are doing. So you can shine a light on the best practices of one team against another team. Exactly, yeah, and you know. Finally, to wrap up on that, I mean you say it goes across industries, but you know, the number one headline I want people to remember from this is the speed check really provides that leading indicator and the correlation that is unquestionable about speed of execution versus hitting the number as a leading indicator versus a lagging indicator, and this is a different approach to how you fix that problem. That cuts through it very, very quickly. It's why we're doing this podcast. It's because that's what's giving us the momentum and to be able to benchmark how your organisation and your teams are doing versus the many, many that we've got across the industry now. It's pretty exciting, it is yeah.

Speaker 3:

Having an anchor point, but it's a line to start with. It's very empowering.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, exactly, amazing. Hopefully this has been helpful to our listeners. Thanks, pip, for joining me and not calling me Victoria more than once.

Speaker 3:

I'm going to call you, victoria.

Speaker 2:

It's a pleasure, vic, thank you. So thank you for listening to this special episode of Get Amplified. You all be delighted to know that Sam is going to be back with us next time. We've sneaked this one in without him because he's a busy man and it was just a pure amplified one, and so look forward to you joining us next time. Thank you.

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